May 28, 2011

Osou!

 
 
Yasuharu Hasebe is an "unsung hero" of the pinku eiga genre. With films like Rape! 13th Hour, Assault! Jack the Ripper, or the unpretentiously titled Rape!, Hasebe has carved a niche in which to rest surrounded by the most subversive sleaze to be found, all his own creation. Though not sleaze in the general sense of the term, most of Hasebe's films juggle what which most people refer to as "misogynistic" tendencies Osou!, for example, is the tale of Kumiko, a policewoman who is brutally raped by a strange attacker after an automobile collision. Not stopping with one count of sexual assault, the stranger returns time and time again to penetrate her at her most vulnerable moments, eventually reaching the point in which she wholeheartedly looks forward to their next rendezvous. It's not about the how, it's about the why. Osou! takes a woman and places her in such a situation. Libidinous to a fault, her own desires mesh with the savagery exhibited by her non-consensual lover producing a whole new woman. Ideally, you'd imagine that with the right treatment, a woman could adapt to a similar sexual situation, if not for consent than surely for instinct. Kumiko pines for violation by Osou!'s halfway mark. She is mesmerized by force and blunt seduction, which is not an uncommon fantasy for most women. It starts off simple with compliance towards biting, minor rough play, and the ever-effective hands-around-throat. Once the seed of obscure practice blossoms, a warmer reception may be held towards more extreme activities. This isn't misogyny in the slightest, it's evolution.

 

Before the audacious assault of a policewoman in a police station, Hasebe makes sure to pamper his actress with backdrops of thick concrete jungles for her to explore and enough motive to warrant the aggravated attacks committed against her. In a word, Kumiko is kind of a bitch. Had you ever had a run in with a police officer, I'm sure you've whined and complained about the balance of fair and unfair. Perhaps you were traveling 50 mph in a 40 mph zone - Mr. Important has got an important date to keep. Kumiko flips through her previous tickets to interrogate possible suspects and on her quest, apologizes to many people she may have wronged or been unfair to. A parking ticket certainly isn't grounds for bodily repossession, correct?  For Hasebe, uniform is key to the eroticism within Osou!. Most males, hell, women too for that matter, admit to being aroused by uniform and costume in the bedroom. For this reason alone, Osou! inhabits the very core of eroticism in rape and not some far off filmic plane of exploitative trash and senseless buggery. The rapist assuredly is committing an illegal and unanimously frowned upon act but Kumiko takes it without principle, without morality. She sheds away the layers of incorrectness to find the heart of the act; pleasure. One might spite my words and cry offense to them but I'll have you know my words are no more offensive than the film they are in response to.


Sex follows Kumiko everywhere. Osou! is essentially an odyssey of sexual appetite. You'd swear angelic Kumiko hadn't an idea of the act with her tight and proper appearance. Once she is raped though, things swiftly change. Confronting possible suspects, she is seated inside of a car, conversing with a man she had ticketed previously as he has sex in close proximity. Following this incident, Kumiko decides to spend the night at her sister's house but is awoken by her sister's husband, as he ravages her body with his tongue. Aghast, the sister thrusts Kumiko out onto the streets with tears brimming in her eyes. This is a documentation of a woman uncovering the beastly side of Japan, no, men, as she is manhandled at every turn and thrown into dizzying sexuality. Definitely a strong film of Hasebe's, Osou! manages to help us discover what it means to hold onto that which fractures us. Once Kumiko begins masturbating, she comes to terms with her impure bits & bliss. Aiding the frenzied attacks is an array of strongly composed classical pieces that flutter closely over the head of the mysterious black-gloved rapist. One would expect to be averse to the rape, as it is an act of territorial noncompliance. However, Kumiko has the self-defense skills of a muzzled orangutan which leaves sympathy nowhere to be found. That's not to pull a card of natural selection, simply, it's too damn silly, her falling into the traps of a secret admirer almost repetitiously. Yasuharu Hasebe reigns king over this land of forced sexual encounters and there seems to be hardly anyone who can hold a torch to his objectifying of women. Osou! is a classic of his standard.

-mAQ

14 comments:

Phantom of Pulp said...

Great to see your acknowledgment of Hasebe's contribution to a sub-genre he defined. His films exist beyond "Pink", finding angles on objectification that are fresh and transgressive. "Osou!" is of his handful of great. "Yaru!" redefined the genre even further.

Anonymous said...

I dare you to reveiw "Kung Fu Panda 2", i double dare you.

Soiled Sinema said...

It was actually a great animated film. I watched that and The Hangover Part II in the span of 14 hours and Kung Fu Panda 2 was leagues ahead of the horrid Hangover sequel. The 3D was quite impressive as well.

-mAQ

Anonymous said...

Its strange but i cant really picture mAQ watching those two piles of ultra-mainstream Hollywood bullshit, somehow it makes a total nonsense of everything that Soiled Sinema stands for.

Soiled Sinema said...

I'm employed at a movie theater, jackass. It is a part of my job description to screen the films before release.

-mAQ

Anonymous said...

Yes but that still doesn`t mean that you have to actually waste your time watching the films does it, as a cinema projectionist all you have to do is start the film running and then sit down and eat cakes and drink coffee for the entire running time of the film without having to endure the nausea of the film itself, you dont have to actually inflict the film on yourself like the poor silly bastards in the auditorium who are idiotic enough to be attending the screening in the first place.

Soiled Sinema said...

No. None of that is right. This must be your British sensibilities (stupid) talking. We run 35mm. All splices must be checked before the release. But thank you for knowing everything.


-mAQ

Anonymous said...

But checking the splices still doesn`t mean that you have to actually watch the film does it ? (at least not in the traditional sense where-by you are actually concerned with whats going on in the film or being entertained by it). As i said, i would have thought that you could check the splices without actually imposing the film onto yourself, as it were, (especially knowing the levels of contempt and hatred that you have for the Hollywood product, and rightly so).

Soiled Sinema said...

So, by your definition, I could either

A) Sit upstairs and stare through the smeared port-glass window for 2 hours+ watching for bad splices

B) I could sit comfortably in a chair and watch a film - any film. Everything the extraneous light touches... is my kingdom. Which would you choose, hamster-boi?

-mAQ

Phantom of Pulp said...

This exchange, for me, is kind of what is wrong with cults and fandom. People love excluding things as if that somehow makes them more "alternative". I see no issue with you watching or reviewing PANDA. There is good and bad in everything. "Cult Cinema" is mostly a swarm of shit. The hits and misses are no different or more consistent than those in the mainstream. To paraphrase: Who'd join a club that wants you as a member?

jervaise brooke hamster said...

Sitting comfortably in a chair watching a film sounds like the best choice as long as the film in question isn`t British of course. By the way, "Everything the extraneous light touches... is my kingdom", Shakespeare (the bloody, dirty, British, scumbag, faggot, bastard) would have been proud of that line.

Soiled Sinema said...

Well put, Phantom. On that note, you should yourself watch Kung Fu Panda 2.

-mAQ

jervaise brooke hamster said...

mAQ, "The Hangover: Part II" has made twice as much as "Kung Fu Panda 2" in North America in their first five days of release, doesn`t that rather make a nonsense of your initial summation regarding the quality of those two movies ! ?.

Phantom of Pulp said...

I intend to give PANDA a look, my friend.

***

As for you, Self-Loathing Hamster, Britain, like any country, is a mess of good and bad.