Aug 3, 2008

Bonnie and Clyde


Bonnie and Clyde was one of the first revolutionary films of late 1960's “New” Hollywood. This new studio era produced films promoting subversion, promiscuous sex, revolution and overall disdain for authority. It seems that Hollywood was a supporter of the various “liberation” movements going on in America during that time period. In Bonnie and Clyde, Hollywood decided to make a film about real-life depression era outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. The film also just happens to be the best of the “American New Wave” films.

Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway were perfect for the roles of title characters. Beatty plays a “cool” outlaw with a hillbilly charm that anyone could get along with. Faye Dunaway is captivating as a stunning vixen that only Warren Beatty could tame. Both characters really do prove that opposites attract and remain bonded till death. The two stars of the film are obviously more appealing than the real outlaw couple.


Left: Real-life Bonnie and Clyde

Right: Hollywood's Bonnie and Clyde


Bonnie and Clyde
features a soundtrack of energetic banjo playing that adds auditory perfection to the films dirt road aesthetic. The simplistic yet radiant cinematography make the film very easy on the eyes. Despite the violent nature of Bonnie and Clyde, the film is fairly calm and soothing. Bonnie and Clyde director Arthur Penn seemed to take some notes from the directors of the European “New Wave” film movements. Bonnie and Clyde is one of few Hollywood studio films that I would consider a masterpiece.

Bonnie and Clyde seem to have some problems in the bedroom as Clyde is not much of a “lover boy.” From the beginning of the film, it is apparent that Bonnie is sexually repressed and aggressive. Despite Clyde’s sexual problems, he is the only man that can satisfy Bonnie. Only near the conclusion of Bonnie and Clyde do the two lovers accomplish a full exercise in physical love. The love “climax” is a fitting scene before the final violent climax of the film.


-Ty E

6 comments:

jervaise brooke hamster said...

this film is one of the greatest examples of art and commerce combining to almost total perfection. By the way, you said that there are only a few other mainstream hollywood studio made films that you would consider masterpieces, i`d be really interested to hear what they are, perhaps you could list them.

jervaise brooke hamster said...

I SAID PERHAPS YOU COULD LIST THEM PLEASE !!!.

jervaise brooke hamster said...

i want to bugger faye dunaway (as she was in 1967, not as she is now obviously).

jervaise brooke hamster said...

You know i`d still be really interested in that list.

jervaise brooke hamster said...

Almost 2 years on and i`m STILL waiting for that elusive list ! ! !.

jervaise brooke hamster said...

So you published this com-girl-t but you didn`t publish the Schwarzenegger or Speilberg com-girl-ts, thats quite interesting. I`m still trying to work-out what criteria you use when deciding which com-girl-ts to publish and which ones not to, admittedly most of the time it seems random but on a few occasions here and there i get the impression that you`re chickening out, and when that happens it doesn`t seem to fall in line with what this site is supposed to be all about. Ty E and mAQ dont run and hide from anyone but sometimes when The Hamster applys the pressure even they cant seem to deal with it, more evidence of course that The Hamster is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.